Monthly Archives: February 2016

Results of Snow Dyeing

The snow dyed fabric looked a very dark before it was rinsed. I could see some purple and a little blue, but mostly it looked grey and black.

snow dyeing purple pre rinse

Shibori folded fabrics ready to rinse

After, the fabric was washed, the vibrant colours and stunning patterns were revealed. It’s always a surprise to see the washed results of snow dyeing, you can’t predict the colour or the design.

Snow dyeing purple square fold

Itajime Shibori snow dyed square fold

I love the piece below, it looks like you are looking through a leaded glass window!

Itajime Shibori triangle fold

Itajime Shibori triangle fold snow dyed

My most incredible piece of snow dyed fabric is the mandala shape below. A metre of fabric was folded into a wedge shape and the melting snow created this magical mandala!

Snow dyeing purple mandala

Snow dyed mandala

I dyed a few more pieces of fabric before the rain fell and melted all the snow. I will rinse and iron those fabrics and have them ready next week. I wonder if we will get more snow soon? I think I’ve found a new addiction!

 

Snow dyeing with Procion MX fabric dye

This is what it looked like in the corner of our backyard yesterday. A very light snow fell consistently throughout the day, prompting me to do some snow dyeing!

Snowfall February 2016

Snowfall February 2016

The fresh snow was perfect for dyeing fabric with Procion MX dyes. Vicki Welsh of Field Trips in Fiber recently posted tips on snow dyeing. She achieved some very beautiful results. I especially loved the mandalas shapes that she created.

Snow on branches

Snow on branches

I have done some snow dyeing in the past and have been happy with the results. What I haven’t tried is dyeing fabric using Shibori techniques to create mandala designs. I folded a one metre cut of fabric into a wedge and then refolded it into a rectangle.

Shibori folded fabrics ready to dye

Shibori folded fabrics ready to dye

The other two white pieces of fabric are fat quarters accordion folded into: a triangle and square. I used Nui Shibori on the olive fabric, creating a row of diamond and a row of circles, the rest is scrunched up. The fabrics were soaked in soda ash, wrung out and arranged in a plastic tub that I poked holes into for drainage.

Fabric covered with snow

Fabric covered with snow

I went outside and packed snow on top of the fabrics, piling up about four inches or so. I placed the plastic tub into another tub to catch the melted snow.  I layered a few plastic yogurt lids underneath so that the perforated tub would sit above the melted snow.

Dye covered snow

Dye covered snow

I mixed three colours of dye: black, cerulean blue, and fuchsia and randomly poured the dye concentrate over the top of the snow. The entire project was placed safely into the laundry tub overnight. I expect that all the snow will have melted by the end of my work day today. I can’t wait to see the results!

 

Fuchsias – a flower quilt!

I took the photograph of the fuchsias a couple of years ago with the idea of using them in a quilt design. I took a workshop taught by Helen Garland through the Yorkshire Rose Quilters’ Guild of Toronto based on Ruth McDowell’s art quilting techniques.

Fuchsias

Fuchsias

In the class we learned to how to draft a pattern from our own photograph using Ruth McDowell’s technique. Helen was an excellent teacher, explaining the concepts, design and sewing techniques that make Ruth’s quilts so original.

Fucshsia pattern

Fuchsia pattern

I’ve focused my design on three of the larger fuchsias and the three small buds on top. I’ve eliminated extraneous leaves and flowers to focus on the elements that I thought would make a good design.

Fuchsia patterns

Fuchsia patterns

You can see my original design and the enlarged copy. The finished piece will be about 48″ x 56″. I am excited to be trying Ruth’s techniques. She has written a few books explaining her design and piecing techniques. The books are available on her website. The next logical step is to trace the design onto freezer paper. But, my next step is to pull fabrics from my stash – I can’t wait!

 

Indigo Shibori silk scarf with rust!

This silk scarf was found in our garage a couple of weeks ago, left outside from my last indigo dyeing weekend in the fall.

Indigo Itajime Shibori silk scarf

Indigo Itajime Shibori silk scarf

I brought the scarf to the member’s demonstration night at the Yorkshire Rose Quilters’ Guild of Toronto meeting in January. I unfolded the clamped scarf to reveal the great design and ….

Indigo Shibori silk scarf

Indigo Shibori silk scarf

RUST!!

Indigo Shibori silk scarf close-up

Indigo Shibori silk scarf close-up

I had used home canning snap lids as the resist. The snap lids were clamped around the silk scarf for three months, much too long, and the lids began to rust. I’ve rinsed, washed and washed the scarf, but the rust is permanent. I will cut up this silk scarf and use it as yardage in a quilt. I will have to keep better track of my scarves in the future. Have you lost anything you’ve worked on?