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Indigo Dyeing Fall 2016 – scarves

I rinsed out a few of the scarves I recently indigo dyed. I couldn’t wait to see the designs created by the various resists I used.

Three bamboo rayon indigo scarves
Three bamboo rayon indigo scarves

Three of them are rayon bamboo. These scarves have a lovely drape and feel luxurious.

Two bamboo rayon indigo scarves
Two bamboo rayon indigo scarves

The indigo is a nice intense blue and each of the three scarves has very different patterning.

Itajime Indigo bamboo rayon scarf
Itajime shibori indigo bamboo rayon scarf

I especially like the design below, it is very angular and modern looking.

Itajime Indigo bamboo rayon scarf
Itajime shibori indigo bamboo rayon scarf
Itajime Indigo bamboo rayon scarf
Itajime shibori indigo bamboo rayon scarf

I also over dyed two viscose scarves. Earlier in the year, I dyed them with Procion Mx dyes. One was dyed in turquoise and the other in blue. The results for both scarves were very pastel and not to my taste.

Nui shibori indigo viscose scarf
Nui shibori indigo viscose scarf

Now they are a beautiful soft denim blue. They would look great with jeans, a white shirt and a blazer.

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Indigo dyeing Fall 2016

I was hoping to squeeze in one last weekend of dyeing and was lucky to have a beautiful day this past weekend, to set up an indigo dye pot.

oct2016_indigo_preparation
Arashi and nui shibori

I had some pfd fabric that I wanted to dip in the pot, as well as some scarves that I wanted to over dye.

Sushi and itajime shibori
Sushi and itajime shibori

I tried one new technique: sushi shibori. The fabric is fan folded and then rolled up like a sushi roll, wrapped with elastic bands or string.

Itajime scarves and quilting cotton
Itajime scarves and quilting cotton

Three scarves and one metre of pfd cotton folded and clamped.

Linen napkins and quilting cotton wrapped and bound - itajmie shibori
Linen napkins and quilting cotton wrapped and bound – itajime shibori

I made two sets of linen napkins: four are cocktail sized and four are generous dinner sized napkins in a light beige colour. I use all sorts of items as a resist including canning lids, paint stir sticks, plastic electrical wall plates, elastic bands, and pieces of wood.

Scarves to be overdyed
Scarves to be over over dyed

I had a few scarves that I had dyed but wasn’t happy with the way they turned out. Two of them were rayon but they didn’t absorb the dye very well and turned out very pastel. The green in the lower right was dip dyed in green and yellow dye baths but the result was not very interesting. The shawl on the left was dip dyed in blue and it was boring as well. All of these were destined to be re-dyed. I am looking forward to seeing the results.

Indigo bundles and fabric drying
Indigo bundles and fabric drying

It was a beautiful, sunny warm day and I set my work area outside. The drying rack is loaded with some of the dyeing.

Indigo yardage
Indigo yardage

I hung some of the fabrics from some low hanging branches in between dips.

Indigo yardage and overdyed scarf
Indigo yardage and over dyed scarf

The cotton yardage is still wet in the photo above and is darker than when it is dry. The green strip is one of the scarves I over dyed. It already looks much better than before!

Indigo scarves and yardage
Indigo scarves and yardage

I wanted to speed up the oxidation and drying process, so I carefully unfolded some of the clamped pieces and suspended them from low hanging branches. I am still waiting for some of the wrapped arashi shibori pieces to dry.

Indigo arashi cotton fabric
Indigo arashi cotton fabric

Last night I carefully unwrapped the damp fabric from one of the pvc pipes. I love the texture of cotton. I hope that the deep blue colour remains after it is washed. There are still a few pieces I haven’t unfolded, maybe next week.

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Dyeing solid colours

l finally ironed the fabric that I dyed during the Labour Day weekend. With this dyeing session, I was trying to obtain colours that were fairly regular with little or no mottling. To obtain this result, I spent five minutes constantly manipulating the fabric when the dye was added. Once the soda ash was added, I manipulated the fabric for another minute. All of the colours were left in the dye buckets overnight.

sep_handdyed_fabric

Of all the colours I dyed, the black is the most consistent, with very little variation in colour.

Black
Black
Purple
Purple
Royal Blue
Royal Blue
Cerulean Blue
Cerulean Blue
Turquoise
Turquoise
Green
Green
Red
Red
Fuchsia
Fuchsia
Orange
Orange
Golden Yellow
Golden Yellow
Yellow
Yellow

The other fabrics show more variation in their colour, especially the darker colours like the purple, blues and green. I do like the effect of the mottling and it can be used to great effect. In some of the fabrics, the variation of colour looked like feathers, some looked like flowers.

Next time, I will experiment with pre soaking the fabrics in the soda ash and then adding the dye. This might produce more consistent colours. Definitely, dyeing fabric flat on a table as Kathleen Probst and Robyn Ferrier describe in their blogs results in very solid looking colours. What do you look for in hand dyed fabrics?