Verona Tessile 2017 – Part 1

The International Textile Art Contest

Early in the new year I began working on a new piece for the International Textile Art Contest, held in Verona, Italy. My piece, The Fever was accepted into this juried show. When I was notified of my acceptance, I decided to attend Verona Tessile 2017.

Palazzo dei Mutilati Verona, Italy

Palazzo dei Mutilati Verona, Italy

Verona Tessile is organized by the Ad Maiora Association, in collaboration with the Verona Municipality to promote textiles as an art form. This year, the theme of the International Textile Art Contest was: Love, the red thread that unites. Thirty-four works were accepted into the show, one of which was my piece: The Fever.

Entrance to the International Textile Art Contest in the Palazzo dei Mutilati Verona, Italy

Entrance to the International Textile Art Contest in the Palazzo dei Mutilati Verona, Italy

The international exhibit was held at the Palazzo dei Mutilati in the historic centre of Verona, steps from the Verona Arena a Roman amphitheatre. Eight other exhibitions were held around Verona, highlighting quilts and textile arts. More photos on these will come later!

THE FEVER

The Fever at the Palazzo dei Mutilati, Verona Italy

The Fever at the Palazzo dei Mutilati, Verona Italy

The Fever in progress

The Fever in progress

Last year I made Spiral, a small quilt for the Crossing Borders Art Group. I knew I wanted to try the same technique to make a larger work. The Verona Tessile International exhibit provided the perfect opportunity. I began with a selection of fabrics in black to grey, burgundy to pink in hand dyed and commercial cottons, linens, and silk and pieced a large log cabin block.

The Fever laying out the spiral

The Fever laying out the spiral

Once the log cabin top was completed, I drew a spiral freehand, coming out of the centre square. With my hand dyed cotton, I made a narrow bias strip which was pinned and pressed into the spiral shape I had drawn.

The Fever cutting spiral

The Fever cutting spiral

Next was the scariest step – cutting the spiral!

The Fever inserting bias

The Fever inserting bias

The bias strip was carefully stitched from the centre square out. I love how inserting the bias strip caused the log cabin to twist around, distorting the block. The central portion was layered with wool batting over cotton quilt batting and machine quilted in a spiral.

The Fever detail

The Fever detail

In submitting my piece into the Verona Tessile show, I need to write a description of the techniques, materials and motivation behind the work. This is the what I wrote:

In my piece, The Fever, the bright red thread of love emerges from the central square of a log cabin block. Traditionally this center square was made out of red cloth representing the heart and hearth of the home. In The Fever, the central square contains both reds and black because love can be pure and selfless or false and egotistical. The block was constructed with strips of fabric ranging from pale pink to deep burgundy and from gray to black. As the red bias spirals through the log cabin quit, it cuts through the dark shadows and the bright sunshine, just as love changes and evolves. This piece continues my exploration of the symbolic log cabin block to make a piece that is modern and contemporary. The Fever is machine pieced with hand dyed fabrics, commercial cottons, silk, and linen. It is machine quilted with a walking foot in a spiral pattern through three layers of batting in the central portion of the quilt.

The Fever by Doris Lovadina-Lee

The Fever by Doris Lovadina-Lee

It was exciting to be able to attend the Verona Tessile show in person. So many talented quilters created beautiful pieces with the theme: Love, the red thread that unites. The next post, I will highlight some of these spectacular quilts.

 

2 thoughts on “Verona Tessile 2017 – Part 1

    1. dorisL Post author

      Yes, the twisting of the log cabin block really adds dimension and interest. Need to play with this a bit more!

      Reply

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