10 minute blocks

I decided that I one of my resolutions for 2015 was to improve my free motion quilting. So, I pulled out these large blocks and began.

10-min quilt blocks
10-min quilt blocks

These blocks have been pieced for at least 3 years! They are about 15 inches square with lots of space to practice free motion quilting.

10-min quilt block quilted
10-min quilt block quilted

In the block above I quilted a different free motion design in each quadrant.

  • top right: meander
  • bottom right: loops
  • bottom left: ribbon
  • top left: loops and flowers
Free motion quilting leaf
Free motion quilting leaf
Free motion quilting wood grain
Free motion quilting wood grain

I am happy with the stitching. There is improvement with each quadrant I work on.

Free motion quilting flame
Free motion quilting flame

The blocks are easy and quick to piece. I originally saw a demonstration at the Creative Festival in Toronto probably three years ago! I went straight home and made all the blocks. Suzanne McNeill has a YouTube tutorial that shows just how quickly you can piece these blocks.

Free motion quilting wave
Free motion quilting wave

Six blocks are quilted only nine more to go.

Did you make any resolutions for 2015?

More Hand Dyed Fat Quarters

These fat quarters were dyed using extra dyes left over from another project I worked on in the fall. It had been a while since the dyes were mixed and I wasn’t certain how the fabric would take the dye. I selected 6 pieces of PFD (prepared for dyeing) fabric and put them in the dye baths with no expectations. These are the results.

Hand dyed fabrics folded 2015

My favourite piece is third from the left below. Both red and yellow dye were added to the container. The result is a watermelon pink with some yellow areas. The biggest surprise from the dye bath is the piece on the left. In the container it was a deep intense blue, after rinsing out the excess dye, the blue looks like a patch of frozen ice.

Hand dyed fabrics hanging 2015

I also dyed a piece of cheesecloth and am pleased with the colour and look of it. There is a lovely variation in the colour and the texture is scrumptious too!

Hand dyed cheescloth 2015 Hand dyed cheescloth roll 2015

I have a piece of silk velvet that is waiting to be dyed. I used hand dyed velvet, that I purchased, in the Icterine series and love the texture it gives to a piece. I haven’t decided what colour I want my velvet to be yet! What types of fabric have you tried dyeing?

Chrysalis Awakening – SOLD!

I am happy and excited to announce that my quilt: Chrysalis Awakening has been sold!

I hope the new owner loves it as much as I enjoyed making it. This piece was donated to the Canadian Quilters’ Association fund-raiser: It’s Time For Colour and all the proceeds are going to the Children’s Wish Foundation of Canada.

Chrysalis Awakening Quilt
Chrysalis Awakening Quilt

The show is now on the road and the travel schedule is available. It’s Time For Colour travelling show will be in Southern Ontario in April 2015. I am looking forward to seeing the other beautiful quilts in person. Keep checking the travel schedule for updates and additions. There are still a few quilts available but I suspect they will be snapped up quickly. If there is one you love, don’t hesitate – the proceeds are going to a great cause!

Chrysalis Awakening greeting cards
Chrysalis Awakening greeting cards

Greeting cards of all the quilts are also available for purchase, just contact Laine Canivet at membership@canadianquilter.com to purchase. 

Pieced – embroidered and beaded quilt

This is the improvisationally pieced top I created using an embroidered and beaded sample I made years ago. In an earlier post I showed some of the fabrics I pulled. You can see below that not all the scraps made it into the top. I love having a large selection of fabric to choose from. I didn’t sketch out the top, but I knew that I wanted to have the sample in the lower left corner and the blues at the top.

Embroidered quilt top
Embroidered quilt top

I began hand quilting the top without putting the quilt in a frame. It’s a small piece and I like the softness and texture that the hand quilting gives to a quilt.

Embroidery detail
Embroidery detail

Above is a small detail and just the beginning of the quilting and beading process. I have used hand dyed perle cotton thread and added 3 glass beads. I plan on using more beads on the top. I collected up a variety of items that I might incorporate, as well as threads in different weights.  I love having a small project I can work on while still spending time with the family. Do you quilt or work on your projects while spending time with your family?

Paper pieced scrap blocks

I love scraps!

As I am finishing up a project I will take the larger pieces left over, usually less than a quarter of a yard, and cut them into then largest size squares or strips possible. These all go into plastic scrap booking containers. I will go through these boxes (yes, I have more than one!) when I need a small amount of a certain colour, but generally, these scraps sit in their boxes for long periods of time.

paper-pieced blocks
paper-pieced scrap blocks before trimming

I started an improvised quilt top in the fall, which generated a fair bit of scraps. I loved the look of the colours and patterns together. So, I decided to use these scraps to create paper-pieced rectangles.

paper-pieced blocks
back of paper-pieced scrap blocks

I received a calendar in 2011 that was printed with a quilting pattern-a-day. I kept the calendar even though I knew I would never make any of the quilts. Each piece of paper is 6 1/2 inches by 4 3/4 inches. This was a good size to use up the scraps I was generating.

paper-pieced blocks
paper-pieced scrap blocks trimmed

I like using the paper-piecing process when working with scraps. Since many of the scraps are not on grain, using the paper stabilizes the block. The paper stays in the block until I have either stitched it to a piece that is on the straight of grain or into a complete top.

paper-pieced blocks
paper-pieced scrap blocks pressed and trimmed

The improvisationally pieced quilt top that started this process is now completed. It actually turned into 2 finished quilts. I have used all the calendar pages up to February 21st! and don’t have any scraps to deal with! I plan on using up more of the calendar for the scraps generated from my next quilting project.

I don’t know how I will join these rectangular blocks together yet. Maybe with sashing, or joined together. I will let them sit for a while.

Wishing you and your families a very Happy New Year for 2015!

Embroidered and beaded quilt

Even though I have a couple of deadlines looming, Christmas presents to wrap, baking and cleaning, I began another project! This small wall hanging will be the second in a series using some embroidered and beaded samples that I created a many years ago.

Embroidery
Embroidery

I’ve pulled some fabrics that I used in the previous wall hanging and added more. I will be improvisationally piecing the top.

Embroidery with fabric choices
Embroidery with fabric choices

I plan on hand quilting with hand dyed perle cotton, adding more beads and using some beautiful silk ribbon created from recycled saris. I want to have it pieced before Christmas so that I have  a project I can pick up and work on while still hanging out with the family.

 

Placemats from orphan blocks

The traditional guild I belong to – Yorkshire Rose Quilters’ Guild of Toronto has asked for placemats to donate to the Meals on Wheels program. So I pulled a few partially completed blocks to start making some placemats.

Selection of scrap blocks
Selection of scrap blocks

These half square triangles were pieced together in a workshop I took last year. The instructor created beautiful scrap style quilts and taught us her quilting philosophy. She immediately cuts leftover fabric from her current project into various sizes of squares and strips. Similar shapes and sizes are stored together. When she wants to make another quilt, she just goes to the container with the size of scraps she needs and can start piecing immediately.

Selection of cotton backings
Selection of cotton backings

After that workshop, I went home and spent an entire afternoon cutting my scraps and organizing them.

Zig zag placemat
Zig zag placemat

This placemat was straight line quilted with a walking foot.

Teal green placemat
Teal green placemat

Using the same cotton with circles, makes the block disappear. I practiced free motion quilting on this mat.

Pink placemat
Pink placemat

I like how the the quilting is the focus in this pink placemat.

Tulips placemat
Tulips placemat

This last one was an attempt to make a placemat that wasn’t too girly! I free motion quilted columns of leaves.

Four placemats
Four placemats

I didn’t use the purple half square triangles because they were too long and for the size of placemat I wanted to make. So I will leave them for another project.

Meals on Wheels will give these placemats to their clients with their Holiday meal.

Buon appetit!

Pouch swap

 

The Toronto Modern Quilt Guild  is participating in a three-way swap with the Victoria and Maritime Modern Quilt Guilds. We were asked to make a pouch in any size and any style.

I selected some fabrics and orphan blocks to create one of the pouches.

pouch fabric

 

A beaded pull provides a sparkly finish.

orange pouch
Orange pouch – front

The quilting was done with a walking foot, including the curved petals.

orange pouch back
Orange pouch – back

This smaller green pouch has been free motioned quilted with loops. A small pocket is stitched to the lining.

green pouch open
Green pouch – front
Green pouch - back
Green pouch – back

I used the tutorial: Crazy about zippered pouches written by Elaine Theriault. It was one of many great articles found in the premiere issue of QUILTsocial ezine.

I also made a couple of luggage tags.

luggage tags

I hope the recipient enjoys using these items!

QUILTsocial – a new Canadian ezine, blog and more!

QUILTsocial Fall 2014 Premiere Issue

QUILTsocial is a new Canadian eZine for all of us obsessed with quilting. It’s a blog, a weekly bulletin, a monthly newsletter, and a quarterly e-magazine, from the publishers of Needle Pulling Thread.

QUILTsocial emagazine
QUILTsocial emagazine

 

The editor, Carla, asks: When does an obsession become therapy? If quilting is one of the releases we have from the stresses of life, it’s therapeutic isn’t it? Doing something creative takes us away from our ourselves and let’s us concentrate our energies into something we enjoy and gives us pleasure.

QUILTsocial magazine is for all levels of quilters, with patterns, tutorials, and showcasing new techniques.  Regular contributors as well as guest bloggers will share their knowledge and love of quilting.

I have already used the tutorial by Elaine Theriault: Crazy about zippered pouches to create a couple of bags for the Toronto Modern Quilt Guild pouch swap. It’s a three-way across Canada swap with the Victoria and Maritime Modern Quilt Guilds. I will also be using Jennifer Houlden’s On-the-Go place-mat tutorial to create some placemats for the Yorkshire Rose Quilters’ Guild Christmas outreach project for Meals on Wheels.

Chrysalis Awakening cards

I just received these beautiful greeting cards with the image of my “It’s Time for Colour” quilt donation – Chrysalis Awakening. Every quilt has been photographed and the images put onto a set of wonderful greeting cards.

Chrysalis Awakening greeting cards
Chrysalis Awakening greeting cards

You can see all the gorgeous quilts at the Canadian Quilting Association blog: It’s Time For Colour Gallery. All proceeds will go the Children’s Wish Foundation.

Some of the quilts have been purchased and these one-of-a-kind art quilts will find their way to their new owners next year. So, if the piece you love has been sold, you can still purchase the greeting card. Contact Laine Canivet at membership@canadianquilter.com for more information. These blank cards make great gifts!

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