scarves

Shop KOKITO for snow dyed shibori scarves!

I spent a lovely day in Prince Edward County meeting Shelley of KOKITO. This is a charming shop on Main Street in the town of Bloomfield, Ontario where the owners, Shelley Durnin and Jennifer Hadenne curate a beautiful selection of Canadian made and designed items. 

 

lamps, hoodies, bags handmade in canada available in Kokito a shop in southern ontario

Bloomfield is a small town located in the centre of the County. The Main Street is lined with small shops, restaurants and galleries. Everything is within walking distance and the shore of Lake Ontario is close by.

scarves, blankets, pillows and cards on display in back of Kokito store, locally made artisan shopThe shop stocks a great selection and variety of products all made by local artisans. Shelley and Jennifer source all the wares they sell in the shop personally, so every member of the family can find something they love. Kokito’s motto is: “Canadian Design and Lakeside Living” and this certainly describes the aesthetic of the shop.  

Shelves with hand made canadian items in KOKITO shop, Bloomfield Ontario

KOKITO store in Bloomfield ontario gift shop

I am happy to share that Kokito will be carrying my snow dyed shibori scarves as well as indigo napkins and table runners. The stack of hand dyed pieces below will already be out on display in the shop. 

shibori scarves, hand dyed placemats, indigo table runner available at Kokito in Bloomfield ontario shop

Prince Edward County is an area of southern Ontario that I had not visited. It has been described by friends as a beautiful, peaceful, yet vibrant place. I can see why! I hope you have the opportunity to travel to Bloomfield and meander around this pretty little town. When you do, visit Kokito and shop the beautiful locally made artisanal products for yourself or to give as gifts. You won’t be disappointed! 

Hand Dyed Shibori Scarves – Part 2

The best part of dyeing your own fabrics are the beautiful colours you can mix.

Rayon linen Itajime shibori turquoise scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori turquoise scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori turquoise scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori turquoise scarf

Turquoise and blue are beautiful together. I think this would pair nicely with a pair of jeans and navy blazer for the spring.

Rayon linen Itajime shibori blue/gray scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori blue/gray scarf

With the scarf above, I wanted to try to create a plaid design. This scarf was folded, wrapped and dipped three times. Each time, the resist I used was larger, covering up more of the scarf and the dye bath was intensified.

Rayon linen Itajime shibori blue/gray scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori blue/gray scarf

I will try this technique again, and try for a little more variation between the first two dye baths.

Rayon linen Itajime shibori green/gray scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori green/gray scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori green/gray scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori green/gray scarf

A circular resist was used for this yellowish green and blue/gray scarf.

Rayon linen Itajime shibori orange scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori orange scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori orange scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori orange scarf

Coral and brown are always a great colour combination. This scarf was tightly twisted before being dyed.

Rayon linen shibori blue scarf
Rayon linen shibori blue scarf

Cerulean blue and black used to dye the scarf above. The same twisting technique was used as in the coral and brown scarf, but, this was not twisted as tightly. You can see that the dye penetrated the entire scarf with no light spots.

Rayon linen Itajime shibori parfait scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori parfait scarf
Rayon linen shibori parfait scarf
Rayon linen shibori parfait scarf

 

Rayon linen shibori teal/gold scarf
Rayon linen shibori teal/gold scarf

The scarf above was dyed using the Parfait method described by Ann Johnston in her book: Color by Accident. The scarf was first submerged in yellow, then turquoise and finally in the gray. I love the colours together – it looks like two completely different scarves, when it’s folded in half.

All of these scarves are available for purchase: $40.00 each. They are 17″ wide and 70″ long. They are easy to care for: machine wash and air dry. They are a great way to add some colour to your wardrobe this spring!

 

Hand Dyed Shibori Scarves – Part 1

I love dyeing, the colours, designs and textures you can create by folding, scrunching and tying up fabric is limited only by your patience!

Rayon linen itajime shibori fuchsia scarf
Rayon linen itajime shibori fuchsia scarf

 

Rayon linen itajime shibori fuchsia scarf
Rayon linen itajime shibori fuchsia scarf

I found some beautiful rayon/linen fabric that I sewed up into scarves. The fabric has a lovely drape and dyes beautifully.

Rayon linen Arashi shibori pink scarf
Rayon linen Arashi shibori pink scarf

 

Rayon linen itajime Arashi pink scarf
Rayon linen Arashi shibori pink scarf

Each scarf is an original one-of-a-kind piece. Wrap them around your neck, twist them into a belt around your waist, tie them to your hand bag. They will add a dash of colour to any outfit.

Rayon linen Arashi shibori wine scarf
Rayon linen Arashi shibori wine scarf

 

Rayon linen Arashi shibori wine scarf
Rayon linen Arashi shibori wine scarf

These rayon linen scarves were dyed using my favourite colours: fuchsia, pink and purple.

Rayon linen shibori purple scarf
Rayon linen shibori purple scarf

 

Rayon linen shibori purple scarf
Rayon linen shibori purple scarf

The scarves are 17″ wide and 70″ long and available for purchase at $40.00 each. They are machine washable and air dry.

Rayon linen Itajime shibori pink/grey scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori pink/grey scarf

 

Rayon linen Itajime shibori pink/grey scarf
Rayon linen Itajime shibori pink/grey scarf
Rayon linen Arashi shibori purple scarf
Rayon linen Arashi shibori purple scarf

 

Rayon linen Arashi shibori purple scarf
Rayon linen Arashi shibori purple scarf

Next week I have more scarves in other colours to show you. Even though I love pink, I do like all colours and know how to mix them! 🙂

 

Indigo Dyeing Fall 2016 – scarves

I rinsed out a few of the scarves I recently indigo dyed. I couldn’t wait to see the designs created by the various resists I used.

Three bamboo rayon indigo scarves
Three bamboo rayon indigo scarves

Three of them are rayon bamboo. These scarves have a lovely drape and feel luxurious.

Two bamboo rayon indigo scarves
Two bamboo rayon indigo scarves

The indigo is a nice intense blue and each of the three scarves has very different patterning.

Itajime Indigo bamboo rayon scarf
Itajime shibori indigo bamboo rayon scarf

I especially like the design below, it is very angular and modern looking.

Itajime Indigo bamboo rayon scarf
Itajime shibori indigo bamboo rayon scarf
Itajime Indigo bamboo rayon scarf
Itajime shibori indigo bamboo rayon scarf

I also over dyed two viscose scarves. Earlier in the year, I dyed them with Procion Mx dyes. One was dyed in turquoise and the other in blue. The results for both scarves were very pastel and not to my taste.

Nui shibori indigo viscose scarf
Nui shibori indigo viscose scarf

Now they are a beautiful soft denim blue. They would look great with jeans, a white shirt and a blazer.

Indigo Shibori silk scarf with rust!

This silk scarf was found in our garage a couple of weeks ago, left outside from my last indigo dyeing weekend in the fall.

Indigo Itajime Shibori silk scarf
Indigo Itajime Shibori silk scarf

I brought the scarf to the member’s demonstration night at the Yorkshire Rose Quilters’ Guild of Toronto meeting in January. I unfolded the clamped scarf to reveal the great design and ….

Indigo Shibori silk scarf
Indigo Shibori silk scarf

RUST!!

Indigo Shibori silk scarf close-up
Indigo Shibori silk scarf close-up

I had used home canning snap lids as the resist. The snap lids were clamped around the silk scarf for three months, much too long, and the lids began to rust. I’ve rinsed, washed and washed the scarf, but the rust is permanent. I will cut up this silk scarf and use it as yardage in a quilt. I will have to keep better track of my scarves in the future. Have you lost anything you’ve worked on?

 

Arashi Shibori scarf or art?

My favorite fabric dyeing technique is Arashi Shibori. It creates such a gorgeous design. It can be bold with strong lines or delicate with fine veining. This burgundy silk scarf has the latter effect.

Red silk scarf Arashi Shibori
Red silk scarf Arashi Shibori

It would look lovely just hanging as an art piece.

Red silk scarf Arashi Shibori
Red silk scarf Arashi Shibori

It would be equally lovely hanging around your neck!

 

Wool Shibori Scarves

I found some very lightweight wool scarves that I experimented dyeing using fiber reactive dyes and Shibori techniques. I was very hesitant working with wool, but the results were beautiful! The scarf below is a very rich coral colour. It was rolled around a string, pulled tightly, immersed in the dye solution and steamed.

Coral wool scarf Kumo Shibori
Coral wool scarf Kumo Shibori

Working with wool resulted in a shopping trip to a charity shop to buy a pot that I could use to actually steam the scarf. Luckily, I found an enamel pot with steamer insert and lid – perfect for my needs. Once you have used an item to dye, you can no longer use it in your kitchen. After making certain my family was aware that the new pot was off limits, I began having fun.

Coral wool scarf Kumo Shibori
Coral wool scarf Kumo Shibori

My fear working with wool was that I would shrink and felt the scarf, but by slowly heating and then cooling the scarf completely before washing the dye out, there was no problem.

Blue wool scarf Itajime Shibori
Blue wool scarf Itajime Shibori

You can see how fine the wool is in the photo above. The pattern shows through the undyed portions. I was also surprised at how little dye washed out of the scarves. The wool absorbs the dyes beautifully.

Blue wool scarf Itajime Shibori
Blue wool scarf Itajime Shibori

The wool scarves have a lovely soft hand and are just right under a coat, and lightweight enough to use inside as a fashion accessory. I have another scarf to dye and can’t decide on the colour. What’s your favorite colour?

 

Green Shibori scarves

Dip dyeing, where you dip a piece of fabric into a dye vat is one of the easiest ways to dye fabric. Although it is uncomplicated, this technique provides endless variety of design fun.

Dip dyed scarf
Dip dyed scarf

I first saw this technique in Kim Eichler-Messmer’s book: Modern Color: an illustrated guide for modern quilts. In it she wrote about dip dyeing placemats and they were simply beautiful.

Dip dyed scarf
Dip dyed scarf

I’ve been experimenting with this technique and have two scarves to show you. The green scarf above was loosely folded, rolled and placed into a container of green dye. I left it until all the dye had been absorbed. This creates a striped effect with the fabric at the bottom of the container absorbing the most dye and is therefore the darkest.

Plaid dip  dyed scarf
Plaid dip dyed scarf

In the plaid scarf, I first folded, rolled, and dipped the piece in a yellow dye bath. I dried the scarf.

Plaid dip  dyed scarf
Plaid dip dyed scarf

The second step was to refold in the opposite direction, re-roll and re-dip in the second colour. This time I placed the scarf in a turquoise dye bath. I love the colour that is created where the yellow and turquoise intersect. It looks like a much more complicated design. I will be experimenting with dyeing more Shibori scarves in various colour combinations in the future.

Red Shibori scarves

It’s interesting how different these two red Shibori scarves look when they both started off in the same dye bath.

Red Nui Shibori cotton gauze
Red Nui Shibori cotton gauze

The design is very subtle on this scarf, giving it a delicate look.

Red Nui Shibori cotton gauze
Red Nui Shibori cotton gauze

More rows of stitching would make this design more defined and graphic. I will be experimenting with this on another piece.

Red Nui Shibori cotton gauze
Red Nui Shibori cotton gauze

The scarf below was dyed in the same red dye bath and then pole wrapped and dipped in black to create a very striking design.

Red and black Arashi Shibori cotton gauze
Red and black Arashi Shibori cotton gauze

An intense black colour is difficult to achieve. I doubled the amount of dye powder and left the scarf in longer. In some areas of the scarf the black looks more like a very dark purple.

Red and black Arashi Shibori cotton gauze
Red and black Arashi Shibori cotton gauze

When I first began dyeing, I mixed red and blue dyes to create purple as you would when mixing paint. I did get a purple but it was very grapey! not really what I had intended. By mixing red with a small amount of black dye a deep rich royal purple is obtained.

Red and black Arashi Shibori cotton gauze
Red and black Arashi Shibori cotton gauze

I have a few more hand dyed scarves to show you next time.

Linen gauze scarves

My infatuation with dyeing has led me to experiment with fibres other than cotton. I was looking for a linen gauze to experiment with, when I came across Robert Kaufman’s Veneto Linen Gauze fabric. No one locally carried this fabric and I was hesitant to order it online without seeing and touching it.

Indigoseplinengauzeitajime
Indigo Itajime Linen Gauze Scarf

Luckily, Andrea, from On Blueberry Hill had used this linen gauze to make a scarf. She wrote about her experience in a post: Spring gauze wraps. The photographs of the Veneto Linen scarf and a Kokochi Double Gauze scarf she made were beautiful.

Indigo Itajime Linen Gauze Scarf Detail
Indigo Linen Gauze scarf detail

I contacted Andrea to ask about the weight, drape and her experience sewing with the linen gauze, explaining that I was interested in dyeing it. She very quickly responded and kindly offered to send me a piece so I could experiment!

Indigoseplinengauzekumo2
Indigo Arashi Shibori Linen Gauze Scarf

The piece Andrea sent was large enough to make two scarves. I tried two different Shibori techniques. Itajime Shibori is when the fabric is folded and clamped with a resist before dyeing, Arashi Shibori  is rolled and tied around a tube. The two pieces were then immersed in an Indigo dye bath. The experiment was very successful. I am happy with both of the results. The linen has a lovely drape and it accepted the dye very well, creating an intense blue with only a couple of dips in the dye bath.

Indigoseplinengauzekumo1
Indigo Arashi Shibori Linen Gauze Scarf detail

I didn’t take a photograph of the linen before I dyed it, so if you hop on over to Andrea’s blog, you can see the base colour: flax. I love this natural warm colour with the blue designs running through it. This linen gauze is available in white which I think would also look great.

During my Indigo dyeing weekend, I also experimented dyeing a rayon/linen blend and silk fibres. I’ll have more photographs showing those results soon. What fibres have you tried dyeing?

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